The Keeley Chronicles PART 15

The definitive account of the only case of its kind in Northern Ireland, the ongoing campaign for justice and a tribute to the victim of a tragedy still unsolved after 31 years

123. Mar 21st (cropped)

By Keeley Moss

 

Part 15 CONTENTS
Chapter 40: A Flower Attracting
Chapter 41: Legacy
Acknowledgements for Part 15

 

Chapter 40: A Flower Attracting

Inga 1988 RUC poster - Cropped

Reaching Out: A portion of the original 1988 RUC poster that was distributed widely at the time requesting information from the general public

 

Beauty finds refuge in herself

She is suffering
You exist within her shadow

Beauty she is scarred into man’s soul
A flower attracting lust, vice and sin

Manic Street Preachers – ‘She Is Suffering’

 

Friday April 6th 2018 marks thirty years from the night Inga-Maria Hauser arrived in Northern Ireland and was subjected to the vicious and ruthless assault that culminated in her murder practically before she’d even set foot on land. On the 30th anniversary there has yet to be anyone held accountable for what remains the only case of its kind in Northern Ireland.

Recently John Dallat MLA and I travelled to police headquarters in Belfast for a meeting with the man leading the investigation into Inga-Maria’s murder, PSNI Detective Chief Superintendent Raymond Murray, to inform him of our plans for a first-ever memorial in Northern Ireland for Inga-Maria and to discuss the investigation in general. I hope to tactfully discuss some aspects of what was a lengthy and very positive meeting in the next instalment, Part 16, of The Keeley Chronicles.

Many people have mentioned to me over the two years I’ve been working on her case that there was nothing to mark the area where Inga Maria’s life was taken. With that in mind, on Friday April 6th at 1pm myself and John Dallat MLA are to host a special event at the entrance to Ballypatrick Forest just outside Ballycastle at the northernmost tip of County Antrim to mark the 30th anniversary and where we plan to unveil the first-ever inscription stone for Inga-Maria. The event will also feature a performance of music that will hopefully accurately reflect Inga-Maria’s artistic nature and her love of music. All are welcome to attend and I would encourage you to do so.

I would like to extend thanks to the followers of this blog for your patience as I’ve waited to follow-up Part 14. I generally publish a new instalment each month without fail but I’ve left a three-month gap this time, quite deliberately, out of respect to the PSNI as soon as I became aware that their preference was for a lull in all coverage of the case in the months leading up to the 30th anniversary in order to focus the attention of the press and public on the next major concerted push in April and not risk diluting the impact of such a landmark anniversary. In the meantime I’ve been working away quietly behind the scenes in a number of ways. But as we approach the 30th anniversary, I intend for this to be the first of three new instalments on the blog in relatively quick succession, which will hopefully compensate for the paucity of new posts over the last few months.

With each instalment of The Keeley Chronicles I always endeavour to try and do something new, focusing on a different aspect each time, partly because like many creative people I have an aversion to repetition and partly due to the fact that I’m mindful that this case is now on the cusp of its 30th year and I am wary of going over too much familiar ground. So the main theme of this month’s instalment is something I haven’t covered before, focusing primarily on poetry and song lyrics inspired by Inga-Maria’s short life and the long shadow her murder has cast ever since.

In recent days I’ve been heartened to receive not one but two sets of poetry written in honour of her. The first is actually a trilogy – or “triptych” – of short poems penned by a strikingly-talented poet from Kilrea, Co. Derry named Clare McCotter. As you’ll see, her ability at weaving words is quite brilliant. The triptych was recently published on the Poetry24 website and I have received Clare’s permission to publish it in full on The Keeley Chronicles (see below). It is a beautiful and very moving homage to Inga-Maria.

But that’s not all – I was very touched to receive a poem written by John Dallat MLA about Inga-Maria which he completed roughly around the same time as Clare’s poems. As anyone who takes an interest in politics in Northern Ireland will likely be aware, John is someone with a long and illustrious career in politics and who currently represents East Derry on behalf of the SDLP. He holds the notable distinction of having been the first-ever nationalist mayor of Coleraine and also spent nine years as Deputy Speaker of the Northern Ireland Assembly. But even more importantly in my opinion, he has been the only public figure to repeatedly call for justice in Inga-Maria’s case and previously made a direct approach to the then-RUC Chief Constable Ronald Flanagan. It is clear from numerous public statements he has published regarding Inga-Maria’s case over the years and from all my communication with him that what happened to Inga-Maria has had a profound impact on him. John’s touching poem is entitled No Beauty Hath Ever Been Seen and displays a real depth of feeling and sincerity. It is published below for the first time anywhere.

To make it a trilogy of works inspired by Inga-Maria, I’ve decided to round out this ‘Poetic Edition’ of The Keeley Chronicles with a piece of my own, ‘Plundered Past’, the lyrics to the song I wrote about her which was released as the second single by my now-defunct band Session Motts. I generally don’t like separating words from music as I prefer for the lyrics I write to live where I believe they belong: inside the song, beyond the clear comprehension that can strip a song of what I think is its most essential strength, its mystery. But I want to make an exception in this case, and publish the lyrics here for the first time in full (the Belfast Telegraph previously published the lyrics to the chorus of ‘Plundered Past’ on Page 3 of their July 12th 2017 issue).

For all the success my old band had with our two other singles last year (neither of which were about Inga-Maria) my own personal highlight of 2017 was in hearing one particular line in ‘Plundered Past’ regularly on the radio down South and seeing it as a posthumous achievement for Inga-Maria from beyond the grave, in defiance of her killers who must have thought they’d permanently silenced her on that night in Ballypatrick Forest. Although the line from Inga-Maria’s diary that I quoted in the song may at first glance appear to be innocuous, mundane even, and only consists of a mere four words – those being “Snowy mountains, wild landscape” – which she wrote on the train on her way to Glasgow on what would turn out to be the last day of her life, April 6th 1988, I felt there was something beautiful about the way those four words looked and sounded. I also feel that that line best expresses Inga-Maria’s wonderment at the beauty of nature and her appreciation of the world around her.

Snowy mountains, wild landscape. So simple and yet so descriptive and evocative, setting the scene exactly as she saw and perceived it on a Spring afternoon in 1988 as she gazed excitedly out of the window of a British Rail train while it whizzed past trees and fields en route to the Scottish city as the 1980’s itself raced towards the end of the decade. What makes those four words I think even more poignant is that they display the restless zest of a young person in love with the world, in love with life itself, living out a dream (and that is no overstatement on my behalf – Inga-Maria’s mum Almut was quoted as saying to the Bild newspaper in 2011 that “It was her dream” to travel to the UK and Ireland).

Snowy mountains, wild landscape. As Inga-Maria jotted down those four words in ink that day, she could never have imagined that they would be some of the last words she would write, that within hours she would be erased from this existence seven weeks and one day short of her 19th birthday, the precise circumstances of which remain a secret maintained by a clan of clones bereft of souls. She also couldn’t have possibly imagined that those four words which she penned in her diary as the train tracks beneath her feet clattered as the wheels met steel, each portion of track unwittingly carrying her closer to imminent catastrophe, that those four words would more than 29 years later be quoted in the form of a song inspired by her, and would resound from radios throughout the South of Ireland for several months (although it has to be said, to the obliviousness of most listeners who generally wouldn’t have known what or who the song was about). Plus it’s worth bearing in mind that Inga-Maria’s case has a far lower profile in my native South of Ireland than it has in the North. But it’s something no one can take from me that, however mundane it may sound, I managed to get something that she wrote so innocently and innocuously on a train in April 1988 onto the airwaves in 2017, and which I see as a posthumous vindication, one where the last line of the song would come true upon its release – “I’ll give you the voice they denied”.

 

Chapter 41: Legacy

glasgow-works-1-1988

The View From Here: British Rail train on the outskirts of Glasgow in 1988. Inga-Maria would have taken in this view on her approach to the Scottish city on the last day of her life

 

Triptych

By Claire McCotter ©2018

Back Packer

She is a swallow
on the heart hammering
brink of blue
for weeks her sleep
silvery with dreams
of maps and moons
and magnetic fields
now her bright brown eyes
on the edge of flight
the leap the drop
the rise the rise
the jolt of sky
the swoop the curve
the turn
her maiden voyage
a practice run
wound down at dusk
on a telephone line
her throat full
of sorrel and stars and sun
and miles
and miles of blue
and the miles and miles
of blue to come.

  

Solace

In her bedroom
she is a student of song
practising
guitar chords
before pressing record
not knowing
every time
her mother
presses rewind
the gold crocus
on her child’s tongue
candles the night.

 

Self Seeding

Left broken
in the place seed fell
they brought
their corn haired girl
back home
thinking of those
she might
have brought
to them
her mother
smoothed the earth
out over
her shoulders.
And yet
still in the forest
her dark eyes
blent with theirs
she waits at dusk
among the sika deer.

 

No Beauty Hath Ever Been Seen
A poem by John Dallat ©2018

No beauty hath ever been seen
To compare with the Munich queen
Clad in blue jeans
And full of beans
Looking forward to meeting a mate
My God she is so stunning, so sedate.

Offered a lift in a lorry
Inga-Maria has nothing to worry
No tourist before has come to grief
For her parents at home this surely is a relief.
The lorry is for Belfast or so he said
My God hopefully Inga-Maria is not being misled

A Province-wide search has begun
Is Inga-Maria in trouble or just having fun?
Sighted here and there, far and wide
Her family desperately want her at their side
They know she would not wander
And to strangers she would not pander

More sightings, who did she embrace
Surely this isn’t a murder case?
Inga-Maria is an intelligent child
Bright and creative, loving and mild
Who in their right mind would steal her life?
But such thoughts are now so very rife.

Sadly, those fears were well grounded
Inga-Maria in a forest has foundered
Died defending her honour
As deadly blows rained down upon her
A talented musician, a beauty so stunning
Please God her killers have exhausted their cunning.

 

‘Plundered Past’
Song lyrics by Keeley Moss ©2017

Singing The Beatles’ ‘Let It Be’
In the far-off lands of a plundered past
On this street lived a family
In the far-off lands of a plundered past

You could use your pencils and paint
In the far-off lands of a plundered past
“Snowy mountains, wild landscape…”
In the far-off lands of a plundered past
In the far-off lands of a plundered past

I love you, I live you
The old has become new
You crept in the back door of my mind
I need it, I feel it
I won’t let time steal it
I’ll give you the voice they denied

Eerie glow that bathed the streets below
In the far-off lands of a plundered past
Twenty to 10 they’re lining up
In the far-off lands of a plundered past

Scratches on his face hint at Hell
In the far-off lands of a plundered past
In the far-off lands of a plundered past

I love you, I live you
The old has become new
You crept in the back door of my mind.
I need it, I feel it
I won’t let time steal it
I’ll give you the voice they denied

You crept in the back door of my mind

I’ll give you the voice they denied

 

_____________________________________________________________________

Inga-Maria Hauser cropped-inga-classic-pic-better-quality
May 28th 1969 – April 6th 1988. Never forgotten.

© Keeley Moss 2018

All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced in any form without the permission in writing from the copyright owner.

————————————————————————–

Acknowledgements for Part 15

With thanks to John Dallat MLA and Clare McCotter.

‘She Is Suffering’ lyrics by Richey James. Published by Sony Music Publishing ©1994

Triptych: Back Packer/Solace/Self Seeding written by Claire McCotter. Published by Copyright Control ©2018

No Beauty Hath Ever Been Seen Poem written by John Dallat MLA. Published by Copyright Control ©2018

‘Plundered Past’ lyrics by Keeley Moss. Published by Copyright Control ©2017

25 thoughts on “The Keeley Chronicles PART 15

  1. Hi Keeley
    I just came across your blog about Inga Maria Hauser, which has really caught my attention. I find the blog to be captivating, chilling and emotional. I hope the police catch the perpetrator or perpetrators of this brutal crime. Also I was reading on the internet where there was a memorial service for Inga on the 30th Anniversary of her death and found that a man at the service said that he passed her hitching a lift near Ballypatrick Forest. This cannot be right can it.?
    https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/emotional-scenes-as-inga-maria-hauser-memorial-unveiled-at-forest-burial-spot-36782272.html

    Authorities must have the names of all the people on the ferry crossing between Stranraer to larne that night, if as you believe it was somebody on the ferry that abducted Inga then surely the police should take a DNA sample from all the passengers that are still alive.
    Keep up the good work
    Chris

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Chris,

      My apologies for the very late reply to your comment here, I’ve been working flat-out up the North with Inga’s memorial and a number of other things in relation to the case and am gradually sifting through the large backlog of correspondance sent via the blog that has built up since the memorial.

      Thank you for your very nice feedback about the blog. It is much appreciated.

      As for the man at the memorial service who was quoted in the Belfast Telegraph’s Saturday 7/4/18 issue claiming he saw Inga hitch-hiking, I have been inundated with messages and emails from people enquiring about this in the days since. Having spent every day and night of the past two years researching this case in depth, it is my personal opinion that this man, while presumably well-meaning, is mistaken, and that his alleged sighting is another of the (very many) mistaken sightings that have dogged Inga’s case since its inception.

      Inga, as anyone who has read this blog in detail will surely be aware, and as the revised pathology reports of 2004 confirmed, almost certainly died on the night she arrived in Northern Ireland, on April 6th 1988. She never lived to see daylight in NI and certainly wouldn’t have been wandering around trying to hitch lifts and going sightseeing so far in the opposite direction to where she needed to reach, considering she had to travel to Dublin on April 7th and even that would’ve left her little time to do sightseeing there before she had to catch the ferry to Holyhead to travel on to Swansea and then on to Cardiff to meet her friend who she had arranged to meet there on April 9th and which was the whole point of her trip to the UK in the first place. Also her camera when found had eight rolls of film filled with numerous photos she had taken during her trip and yet after they were developed there was according to police not one photo taken in Northern Ireland, presumably because she hadn’t been there long enough to take any. Also, there was according to the PSNI another backpacker with a similar name and a similar appearance to Inga travelling through the same region in the weeks afterwards, which is quite possibly the person most of these witnesses saw and mistook for Inga. Furthermore, Inga had never once hitch-hiked at any stage of her trip, and what people repeatedly overlook is that she had no need to hitch-hike anywhere – she had a valid Interrail ticket and loved to travel by train.

      As for what you say about “Authorities must have the names of all the people on the ferry crossing between Stranraer to larne that night, if as you believe it was somebody on the ferry that abducted Inga then surely the police should take a DNA sample from all the passengers that are still alive.” I’m afraid it’s rather more complicated than that.

      There was an incomplete manifest (passenger list and vehicle list) for the ferry crossing in question. Detective Chief Superintendent Raymond Murray who is leading the hunt for Inga’s killer or killers has previously stated that while the police cannot be certain that they have tracked down all of the passengers who were aboard the Galloway Princess that night, they have done their absolute best to reach them all. Police have always placed a particular emphasis on the passengers and in particular the motorists on board the Galloway Princess as they strived to match the DNA profile from the crime scene donor in Inga’s case. However, it’s worth bearing in mind that police have long believed that there was more than one person involved in Inga’s murder, possibly several, and have publicly made reference to their possession of evidence and intelligence that supports and strengthens that belief.

      Thanks again for your feedback and your interest in both Inga’s case and my work, and I hope you’ll find the future instalments equally of interest.

      Kind regards,

      Keeley Moss

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  2. @Chris That’s shocking. I’ve just read the BFT story. The man in the hat sounds like the killer. Look at his quotes – referring to the day she died (how does he know?), and saying when he heard about ‘her’ death on the radio A woman he saw from a car.

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  3. I just came across this, and it really is a great thing to keep Inga’s memory like this and bring this killer to the devil. The Belfast telegraph article is strange indeed. This man in a hat knew she was hitchiking ? there is no mention of this—police don’t know of her trail from leaving ferry—and it is a bizarre tail about slowing down and then deciding to drive on. Is this man in the hat fiction from the writer? if not, then surely he would have thought it strange, and told somebody giving it is a new bit of vital evidence. If the man is real, and the witer just isn’t that bright to check details of case, then the man in the hat is the killer admitting his guilt. There is something not right about this whatever the truth is. If the writer has made this up then he needs to apologise and lose his job, or point out the man to police. I find this investigation bizarre, they have been closing in on the killers for many years, but nothing has happened. If they have suspects in mind then why not go arrest them, and DNA test them? It’s not rocket science, or if this is all just police trying to express they are doing something…then stop

    Liked by 1 person

    • Two possibilities : the guy may have been a ‘goer to events’ who took the opportunity to project himself into the scenario with a dramatic (and totally fictitious) ‘I might have saved her’ tale – or the journo may have made it up for effect .

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    • Hi Kevin (and also Bill),

      Please accept my apologies for the late reply to your comments here, I’m still gradually sifting through the large backlog of correspondance sent via the blog that has built up since the memorial.

      Thank you for your kind comments regarding the blog.

      With regards to what you say about the man at the memorial service who was quoted in the Belfast Telegraph’s Saturday 7/4/18 issue claiming he saw Inga hitch-hiking, I’ve been inundated with messages and emails from people enquiring about this in the days since. Having spent the past two years researching this case in depth, it is my personal opinion that this man, while presumably well-meaning, is mistaken, and that his alleged sighting is another of the (very many) mistaken sightings that have dogged Inga’s case since it’s inception.

      As for what you say about the writer of the piece in question (“If the writer has made this up then he needs to apologise and lose his job”) it’s actually a she. I’ve had a number of dealings with them including having been interviewed by them several times and in all my dealings I’ve found them to be a person of professional integrity, so I do not believe she would have made anything up. Many people in the community have approached me similarly with info of having spotted someone they believe was Inga so that is what I suspect happened in the case of the man quoted in the Belfast Telegraph.

      Inga, as I have outlined in detail in Parts 1-3 of this blog, and as the revised pathology reports of 2004 confirmed, died on the night she arrived in Northern Ireland, on April 6th 1988. She never lived to see daylight in NI and certainly wouldn’t have been wandering around trying to hitch lifts and going sightseeing so far in the opposite direction to where she needed to reach, considering she had intended to travel to Dublin on April 7th and even that would’ve left her little time to do sightseeing there before she had to catch the ferry to Holyhead and then travel through Wales and on to Cardiff to meet her friend who she had arranged to meet there on April 9th and which was the whole point of her trip to the UK in the first place. Also her camera when found had eight rolls of film filled with numerous photos she had taken during her trip and yet after they were developed there was not one photo taken in Northern Ireland, presumably because she hadn’t been there long enough to take any. Also, there was according to the PSNI another backpacker with a similar name and a similar appearance to Inga travelling through the same region in the weeks afterwards, which is quite possibly the person most of these witnesses saw and mistook for Inga. Furthermore, Inga had never once hitch-hiked at any stage of her trip, and what people repeatedly overlook is that she had no need to hitch-hike anywhere – she had a valid Interrail ticket in her possession and loved to travel by train.

      With regards to what you said about finding the investigation bizarre, I can understand that but there is a lot that the police are not in a position to reveal or clarify due to legal implications. If they were able to be explicit about those things, I think it’s possible that people might have a much better understanding as to why the investigation has proceeded as it has. It’s easy to criticise the police (and many people do) but what I would say is they have their reasons, and I think those reasons are valid. I find it frustrating that I can’t be more open about what those reasons involve, but securing justice for Inga’s memory and her family is of paramount importance, and certain things that are amongst the basis of a potential prosecution have to remain confidential until those responsible for her murder can be brought before the courts.

      Having recently spent a significant amount of time with Detective Chief Superintendent Raymond Murray discussing Inga’s case at police headquarters, and having studied much of his and his team’s work on Inga’s case from afar, I am of the firm opinion that he is very sincere and extremely-determined to bring the case to a successful conclusion. Furthermore DCS Murray has an enviable record in resolving cold cases, for instance his contribution was crucial in solving the 1981 murder of Jennifer Cardy by serial child killer Robert Black in 2011.

      Kind regards,

      Keeley Moss

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  4. Stephen
    I came across this case back in 1988 whilst at school in Preston. It made the local news on account that Inga Maria had passed through the town on her journey upto Scotland. At the time i was investigating the unsolved murder of Joan Harrison in 1975. The case was personal to me because at the time i was friends with her nephew.
    I happened to come across your blog after the local paper printed an update on the case. I was dumbfounded to read that the case was still unsolved some thirty years later.
    After reading all your entries,i too am horrified at the sheer incompetence of the police in their investigation. Some of their errors over the years have been almost childlike.
    Like yourself,i can’t understand the lack of sightings aboard the ferry that fateful night. She would have had to show her passport to officials on entering Ireland,yet there is no mention of this.
    Also,due to the troubles at the time i find it unbelievable that the terminal at Larne wouldn’t have had cctv monitoring both foot passengers and vehicles alike. Yet,no footage of Inga Maria exists of her exiting the port.
    Apart from the two women who came foward to say they saw her aboard the ferry she appears to be a ghost. As another person stated surely the police have the names of all the people on board and they should have been the first to be interviewed in connection with her murder.
    I’m also somewhat surprised that the German police have never requested to do their own investigation. Maybe,a new set of eyes are needed.
    Keep up the good work. Hopefully,the perpetraters of this wicked act will be brought to justice soon.
    Ps. I still believe the murderer of Joan Harrison is still at large. The man they say commited the murder,Christopher Smith is nothing more than a patsy!

    Liked by 1 person

    • ‘Incompetence’ of the police : You have to keep in mind that we had an ongoing terrorist ‘war’ which had been going on for around 18 years & small numbers of detectives were required to handle incredibly large casebooks of murder & other serious crime – there just weren’t resources to do everything that would have been done in a normal policing environment.
      Lack of sightings : I’ve travelled extensively & people in transit tend not to take a lot of notice of their fellow travellers – you’re in a kind of in between state. Also there’s a common reluctance of people to get involved in stuff like this – you get the ‘I may have seen her but I don’t know anything that would help’ mindset. Lastly many of these people may simply have travelled on & not been aware of the police appeals.
      Arrival at Larne : Inga travelled from one part of the UK to another so no passport required. If she’d arrived at a port in the Repubic of Ireland there would still have been no entry formalities ‘cos we’ve got an arrangement between UK & ROI called the Common Travel Area. What does occur to me (& I’m new to the detail of this horrible affair) is that, because of the security situation at the time in question, persons arriving in N Ireland were subject to scrutiny – at the airports you exited Arrivals thro’ a gateway (like the ticket check at a railway station) where security services personnel would look out for ‘persons of interest’ & most probably photography was also in use. Anyway we were pretty closely watched & I can’t imagine that similar arrangements didn’t exist at seaports.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hi Bill,

        Apologies for the very late reply. You make some very good points there where the Common Travel Area is concerned and also regarding the RUC’s resources circa 1988 being maxed-out with the surrounding mayhem to contend with. And I think what you say about the tendencies of people in transit being in an inbetween headspace that renders them less conscious of the movements of their fellow travellers is very true, that’s certainly the case for myself and I would imagine most other people (although they may be oblivious to it). I’m equally perplexed with the apparent lack of security services monitoring on the night Inga arrived at Larne although I believe the railway platform at Larne Harbour may have had CCTV on the night in question which is why I suspect the police have always been so adamant she never made it to the railway platform at Larne (which has been in marked contrast to their apparent lack of certainty about any of her other movements once the ferry had docked).

        Thanks for your contributions to this comments page and for your interest in the blog, hope you’ll find the future instalments interesting.

        Keeley

        Like

    • Hi Stephen

      Please accept my apologies for the late reply to your comments here, I’m still gradually sifting through the huge backlog of correspondance sent via the blog that has built up since the memorial, since when I’ve been in Northern Ireland working on both the memorial and the case.

      Thanks for your kind comments about the blog, it’s much appreciated.

      That’s very interesting to hear about your investigation into Joan Harrison’s murder – I’m very familiar with the details of that case, having read literally every book published about The Yorkshire Ripper series of murders and attacks over the years (I know Joan Harrison’s murder was for quite some time in the late 1970’s attributed to The Yorkshire Ripper, and certainly was claimed by the geordie hoaxer John Humble in his taunting letters to George Oldfield and the Daily Mirror). I knew that Christopher Smith had been subsequently identified, posthumously, as the man suspected of murdering Joan Harrison, but I wasn’t aware of that judgement having been called into question.

      With regards to what you say in relation to Inga’s case, specifically where you say “I’m also somewhat surprised that the German police have never requested to do their own investigation”, in 1988 the RUC enlisted Josef Wilfling, a high-ranking detective with the German police, to assist them in their investigation. And I know the RUC in 1988 travelled to Germany to interview all of Inga’s close friends and to try further their knowledge in any way they could. Such facts are not widely-known, but perhaps if they were people might have a more positive view of the work the police have put into the case over the years.

      As for what you say where “Maybe a new set of eyes are needed” – that too has already occurred, the details of which I outline in Parts 1 and 3 of this blog. Operation TRACE, the specialist Garda taskforce commissioned in the Irish Republic in 1998 to investigate possible links between the cases of various missing women in the Republic of Ireland presumed murdered, eventually had it’s remit widened to include Inga’s case on the recommendation of the criminal profilers ViCLAS. The national co-ordinator of Operation TRACE Alan Bailey later said, specifically in relation to their re-investigation of Inga’s case, “The access to files, statements and reports that were afforded us by the then Royal Ulster Constabulary, was without precedent, and should be acknowledged”. But Operation TRACE’s fresh eyes ultimately were not able to advance the investigation any further than the RUC had.

      I am very much an independent contributor to Inga’s case – I have no political or religious affiliations, and I am from (and continue to be based) in a very neutral area (Dublin) where the standpoint of the case is concerned. I’m also not a journalist per se, I don’t rely on my work on the case for a living (I’ve never made a cent out of my work on the case, nor would I want to). In other words, I have no agenda and no bias, which I think helps me to maintain objectivity where the various strands of the case are involved. And although the police may have made mistakes over the years, and I agree it’s a very curious anomaly that there was no CCTV monitoring of Larne ferry terminal on the night Inga arrived where either passengers or vehicles were concerned, I would say the police were from the get-go at a distinct disadvantage by the pathologist getting Inga’s estimated time of death wrong by a whole 10-14 days, which hampered the original investigaton immensely. They also weren’t helped by having a vast workload to deal with from the Troubles which was arguably at it’s peak in 1988, and a great many mistaken sightings of Inga partly due to another German tourist with a similar appearance and a similar name travelling through the same area of Co. Antrim, soon after Inga had gone missing (but before her remains were discovered).

      Regarding your comment, “As another person stated surely the police have the names of all the people on board and they should have been the first to be interviewed in connection with her murder.” Identifying all the passengers on board the ferry that night has I’ve been assured always been a prime focus of the inquiry, for obvious reasons, and a particular emphasis was placed on trying to track down all motorists on board. In this respect I would say that the police were most certainly not helped by the Sealink staff member in Stranraer responsible for logging all the passenger and vehicle details of the manifest for the Galloway Princess on the crossing of the 6/4/88 not doing his job properly, for reasons I cannot go into here, and as a result there was never a complete manifest for the crossing. Detective Chief Superintendent Murray is on record as stating that “While we cannot be sure we spoke to every single passenger, we have done our absolute best to reach them all”.

      More than anything else though, I think that if the police were able to release all the details of their investigation, I believe people would have a much better understanding of why the investigation has so far proceeded (or rather, not proceeded) as it has. Unfortunately, as it’s very much still an open investigation, due to legal implications that could negatively impact upon a potential prosecution, such illuminating insights the police are simply not in a position to disclose. For all the many people out there who picked up on the report in the Belfast Telegraph’s 7/4/18 issue of the man who claimed he saw Inga hitch-hiking (when she was already dead), I believe people would be far better advised picking up on something DCS Murray said in his most recent press conference about Inga’s case, where he said in relation to the DNA sample of the crime scene donor, if the identity of the donor is established, “the context of that DNA to the inquiry will become clear”.

      Thanks again Stephen for your interest in the blog, and in Inga’s case, and I hope you find the forthcoming instalments I intend to publish on The Keeley Chronicles equally interesting.

      Kind regards

      Keeley Moss

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  5. After reading more about this case over the weekend i believe that like the first medical examiner concluded after viewing the evidence at the scene and the lack of decomposition to the body that Ingar Maria was indeed murdered later than the 6th of April.
    Several reasons bring me to this conclusion. Looking at photographs of the track show that it is well worn in parts by vehicle tyre marks. This must mean that even though that part of the forest is remote,it still see’s it’s fair share of visitors. Add to this that it was early Spring and the clocks having recently gone foward,and that it was also the Easter holidays it’s safe to say that there would have been plenty of dog walkers,walkers,runners,cyclists,local workmen using those tracks in the fourteen days it’s thought that her body lay by the track in clear sight. How did nobody come across her body when as mentioned with the clocks going foward it would be light for around thirteen hours per day? Plus,also include all the security patrols in the area and something just doesn’t add up.
    Knowing the Irish weather like i do. I ask you,how many days of rain during those two weeks? Yet neither her body or her belongings showed signs of having been outdoors for any significant period of time. A report even stated that her hair was unusually clean.
    I believe the clues to solving this horrific crime lies in her final diary entry. She specifically states that she had nowhere to stay that night and is dangerously low on money. It is a known fact that she cashed twenty pounds of traveller cheques in Stranraer on the 6th of April. Even back in 1988 twenty pounds didn’t go far. She would need food and to pay for accommodation also. Had she paid for her ferry ticket in advance? What about her return ticket to Wales? Maybe,these money issues prompted her to do something out of the ordinary that night and accept a ride from a stranger.
    Much as been said about where and when she must have met this person or persons. I feel she may have met them in Stranraer. It’s the only thing that makes sense. How did only two people out of over 400 passengers notice someone who everyone agreed stood out in a room? Did the two female witnesses notice if she had all her belongings with her when they bumped into her whilst boarding the ferry? If not,she must have left them in a vehicle.
    Also needs answering is when her body was found was she wearing the same clothes she had on on the ferry?
    I believe the person who gave her a ride was probably in his early to mid twenties. Possibly travelling with a female. This would confirm what the police have said about the suspects still being alive.
    Did she go willingly to a house then things took a turn for the worse and maybe she was held against her will? I also don’t think she was driven to the forest at night. Even with considerable knowledge of a wooded area it’s easy to get turned around. Also,any car entering the forest at that time would have drew suspicion from other road users. Plus the security patrols in the area would have made such a trip risky too.
    There has recently been a story about a man claiming to have seen her hitch-hiking near the forest yet he failed to stop. If this was indeed her and she had been assaulted and had managed to escape then why wouldn’t she flag down the nearest car for assistance?
    If this sighting in daylight is true then she must have been staying somewhere close by. Had they kept her passport to prevent her from leaving Ireland? Had one of her abductors felt remorse and let her leave only for the more dominant to return and give chase?
    Maybe,she threatened to go to the police and her attacker launched into a rabid,sickening attack that resulted in her murder.
    All questions to ponder yet i still feel the key to cracking this case lies with what occurred on that ferry ride.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Stephen according to police they have a suspect in mind.
    I find this strange if they know who committed this murder and I believe the psni do know why can’t they nail the scumbag .
    I find this strange as psni has left the public wondering what they really know.

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  7. James,
    The way the PSNI have dragged out this case has striking similarities to the above mentioned Joan Harrison case. For years each force assured the public that an arrest was imminent,and that they were waiting on dna results. In Inga Maria’s case i recall them saying that due to a breakthrough with likely female relatives on the UK dna database that it was when not if the perpetrator would be arrested. That was years ago!
    In Joan’s case police say they took a dna swab from a guy arrested for drink driving in 2008 six days before he passed away from cancer,yet Lancashire police waited another three years to say that the murder investigation was now closed. Three years to get a dna hit! Also,there was no mention if this guy had the distinctive gap between his front teeth or if he was the rare B blood type they’d been searching for for thirty-six years or if he was even in Preston at the time. Case closed! Many people including ex-detectives,journalists and crime writers have questioned whether this man was the actual murderer.
    Hope PSNI do the right thing and give Inga Maria’s family the justice they richly deserve.

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  8. After doing more research,especially looking more closely at the area where Inga Maria met her grizzly and untimely end i have concluded that both the police and public have been hoodwinked by the so called “experts”. From their first inclusion into the investigation they came away with the conclusion that due to the alleged remoteness of where the body was callously discarded that the perpetrator must have had expert knowledge of the surrounding area.
    Therefore,the police should concentrate on searching the local community for the prime suspect into the murder. I find this to be total hogwash and probably the real reason that the killer remains at large today.
    Ireland like the rest of Britain isn’t a large place. Ballypatrick forest in all honesty isn’t either. There arn’t any particular difficult parts of it to navigate day or night. Add to this the ability to use a vehicle within it’s limits makes it’s accessibility all the more easy. Any person with the most basic outdoor knowledge would have had no trouble finding a suitable place to leave a body,let alone a potential suspect with any military training. Add in the time of year and thirteen hours of daylight available and this action was far simpler than the experts would have us believe.
    More worryingly for the police investigating is that this opens up the list of potential suspects to a frightening amount of men who happened to be in Ireland on the fateful night.
    This also leads me to believe that if Inger Marie did indeed get into a wagon that she could have very well gone to her intended destination of Belfast then taken to the forest in a different vehicle at a later time. This theory would go some way to explain why the exhaustive dna testing of the men local to Ballypatrick forest has failed to come up with one positive match.
    I believe the police should start the investigation from scratch and weigh-up the possibilities stated above. Maybe do some experiments to highlight just how easy navigating the forest really is for even somebody with limited or no prior knowledge of the area.
    Food for thought.

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  9. James
    In reply to why would the murderer drive that distance to attack or hide the body. The answer is why wouldn’t they. I’m not saying that Inga Maria did definately travel to Belfast. I was stating that it was a possibilty,as could the fact that without any credible sightings that she could have been taken anywhere on the island.
    In fact,her final resting place is the only positive proof of her whereabouts whilst in Ireland.
    There are numerous possibilities as to why the killer left her body in Ballypatrick forest. Maybe they’d visited on holiday,school trip,boy scouts,sporting activity. The list is endless. The police noted that if the body had been placed fifty yards into the tree line then maybe her body may never had been found. Could this have been their intention,but they were disturbed?
    In response to Bill. I’d like to say sorry,maybe incompetent isn’t the right word,but you would have to agree that for such a high profile case the number of errors that have occurred have been unacceptable.
    As for your reason for the lack of sightings on board the ferry,i can’t agree with you. I know we like to think that we tend to keep to ourselfs and mind are own business. In fact studies have shown that the opposite is true. Think about how many times you’ve been in an airport waiting to board a flight,say to an island in the Med. You might not see several of the other travellers whilst enjoying your stay,but then in the airport on your return how many people do you end up recognizing? I’m not alone here,this even happened to my five year old niece recently.
    In fact,just last weekend i bumped into a friend i’d not seen in a while. Accompanying her was a lady who i’d been introduced to for all of five seconds at a Christmas party over twelve years ago. I instantly reconized her,even with shorter hair and wasn’t surprised to find that she remembered me too.
    This has happened to me too many times to count over the years. I admit that i have a great memory for faces yet i’m no Will Hunting! I find that how so few passengers remember Inga Maria the most baffling part of this investigation. According to studies on how some people are more observant than others,out of the number of people onboard including staff,and taking into account the journey time the number of positive sightings should be much higher.
    It just doesn’t make sense.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Im afraid Stephen I have to disagree with you not to sound rude .
      I believe Inga left the Galloway princess in a vehicle that night in question and Never saw Belfast and was taken in the direction of Ballymena then onwards to somewhere in north Antrim and sadly met her death and then to ballypatrick forest.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. After looking into the original investigation in more depth,i still have a problem accepting the ammended pathologist’s report that Inga Maria’s time of death occurred on the 6th of April.
    Having studied the weather charts for the time period from April 6th until her body was discovered on April 20th,i would have to agree with the first pathology report that the murder had occurred within the twelve hours prior to discovery.
    First of all,ask yourself how an experiencied pathologist could get the time of death so incredibly wrong. For well over a century before Inga Maria’s death medical personnel could determine a person’s death within a twenty-four hour period yet,we’re led to believe that this person was so inept that they miscalculated by an entire fourteen days!
    For the body to be as well preserved and lacking in any decomposition whatsoever,a medical anomaly would have had to occur. As stated,looking at the weather records for the period her body was said to have lay exposed,both the temperatures and excessive humidity experienced would in fact have been ideal conditions for rapid onset decomposition.
    I also would like to know how the original pathologist responded to their report having been discredited some sixteen years later.
    Another thing bothering me is if the adjusted time of death is indeed correct then why wasn’t the body discovered earlier. It’s a known fact that the body was placed by the side of a well worn dirt track that was frequently used yet we are led to believe that nobody came across Inga Marie for two weeks. Had the farmer who discovered her body been down said path in the two weeks prior. If so,why hadn’t he spotted the body sooner? Add to this the fact that this was the Easter holidays and the area was even more popular then than today,and it becomes more and more unlikely that the body had been in the forest for two weeks.
    If indeed the original time of death is correct then the police investigation will have to reconsider all the evidence they received regarding sightings up until the discovery of the body. Most of which would have been discredited after the change in time of death.
    To all of the naysayers out there who dismiss this theory,remember,experts have been known to be wrong before.
    Hopefully,the case will be solved soon. For the sake of Inga Maria and her long suffering family.
    Just this week,the arrest of the so called Golden State Killer in America after more than three decades gives everyone interested in Inga Maria’s case hope.
    Regarding the Golden State Killer case. Something that has totally flummoxed most of the “experts” especially the criminal psychologists,is the fact that a person who is responsible for such vile and wicked acts could appear to stop committing such crimes for over thirty years,seemingly at the flick of a switch!
    Food for thought.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Stephen,

      You make a number of interesting points in your comment there. I welcome your contributions to the comments section of the blog as I think that stimulating debate is healthy and I would always encourage people to take the time to look into the case in depth, formulate their own opinions and arrive at their own conclusions, which is what you have done.

      With regards to what you say here: “It’s a known fact that the body was placed by the side of a well worn dirt track that was frequently used yet we are led to believe that nobody came across Inga Marie for two weeks. Had the farmer who discovered her body been down said path in the two weeks prior. If so,why hadn’t he spotted the body sooner? Add to this the fact that this was the Easter holidays and the area was even more popular then than today,and it becomes more and more unlikely that the body had been in the forest for two weeks.”

      What I will say is that it is my information that the particular place where Inga Maria’s body was located was not in use by the general public in April 1988.

      Also, although Ballypatrick Forest Park is indeed said to be popular with locals, it’s worth bearing in mind that I spent an entire day last year walking all over the forest and during all the hours of daylight I was there, as I detail in Part 9 of this blog, I encountered a mere two people (who were together, so not even two separate people in two different parts of the forest). I encountered literally three times more sheep than I encountered people in the forest overall (six sheep, two people). And those two people I encountered on the main nature ramble, after I had walked through the forest for a full four hours at that point. Ballypatrick Forest Park is a very remote place, and the place where Inga’s body was found is in the most remote westernmost part of it. I have never been anywhere more remote and out-of-the-way.

      With regards to what you say here: “I also would like to know how the original pathologist responded to their report having been discredited some sixteen years later.”

      That’s a good point, I would like to know his view on that myself. The name of the original pathologist is known to me but because I have not spoken with him I haven’t revealed it in the blog. I’ve been informed he retired only last year.

      Thanks again Stephen for your thoughtful comments, and I hope you’ll continue to find the blog interesting. I hope to publish several further instalments of the blog in the coming months.

      Keeley

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  11. Hi Keeley,
    Your blog is a genuine source of inspiration, an illustration of your own purity of heart and hopefully a parable for doing the right thing. Ironically it would probably take only one single person to do the right thing to bring this entire saga to an end and afford the surviving Hauser family the basic courtesy of knowing what happened to Inga-Maria.

    I recall this coming on the news in 1988, only a couple of weeks after my 18th birthday (it impacted me very much indeed because, in addition to its grotesqueness, it resonated loudly as I also harboured dreams of travelling to what was then West Germany and I am the same age as Inga-Maria). I recall the sheer horror-filled reaction of family and friends to the murder, even Northern Irish communities conditioned by years of daily news of bombings, murders, sickening brutality, still found this hard to comprehend. Northern Ireland, Troubles aside, had, and still has, to the best of my knowledge, one of the lowest murder rates of any region in the world.

    I will admit that this had passed into the annals of memory and I was not aware of most of the media coverage in intervening years, though I think one could be forgiven for having missed it, it was scant by all accounts, and on a personal note, I found there was an aspect to televised Northern Ireland news meaning that if you had watched it once you could write the script for it every day thereafter, so I stopped watching provincial TV news for years in the 90’s and 00’s. However, a recent BBC Radio Ulster news bulletin around the 30th anniversary of the murder really got my attention (again thinking of all the life I have had the privilege to experience, mostly very good, some bad, some ugly, but choice-filled life nonetheless, since April 1988, and how being the same age as Inga I was reminded of the cruel way in which her life was ended and how she had been robbed of the opportunity to experience what is everyone’s right to have and nobody’s right to take away) on the commute home from work so I consulted friend Google when I got home. This blog occupied most of the top spots in the search and upon spending a couple hours reading the blog I was simply blown away by the work you have done and now feel captivated by your initiative. And it is fitting that you have highlighted the sterling efforts of John Dallat and indeed the PSNI over the past couple of decades to try to solve the case and raise its profile and awareness to that end.

    There appears to be significant uncertainty (at least to the person on the street) with regards to this case and my brief reading of it. For my money there was only one killer but he had assistance after the fact to help cover up. It seems almost certain though that Inga left the ferry in a vehicle (a lorry by the sounds of it) but if so she had to be transferred to another vehicle before reaching her final resting place – there is no way someone took an HGV into that forest for a raft of reasons. This is perhaps where the accessories/accomplice(s) come in. Is there definitive evidence that she was actually murdered at her final resting place?

    I think the camera is a strong clue as to her death (or taken captive) being on the night of arrival, 6th April, assuming the culprit(s) did not remove film from the camera and that the film found therein fits with the timeline. This is possibly something the police might not have divulged as it would be something known only to the perpetrators.

    The local IRA investigation, if indeed there was one, is an interesting angle too. They (and I don’t speak for them, I speak as a child of the Troubles, born and bred in South Derry (county not city) in 1970) would surely have considered this an example of anti-social behaviour, something they took serious exception to. I have read somewhere they toyed with the idea of passing information to the RUC. That is fanciful, at best, it would never ever have happened. If they did indeed look into it they would have exacted summary justice without the need for State intervention, indeed they would have gone out of their way to ensure there was no RUC involvement. If they had identified a guilty party then that person would have been severely dealt with and might even have disappeared given the nature of the offence.

    So, did any locals disappear around that time (or go to work in England or America ;)) or end up with a stay in a hospital with missing knees or other body parts? If not then either they couldn’t identify a guilty party (in which case people are barking up the wrong tree with the ‘three villages’ insinuation) or indeed the guilty party turned out to be one of their own or closely connected. Or was from the Unionist/Loyalist community and hence not their (the IRA’s) societal responsibility. Even in this latter scenario they would not have passed info to the RUC. The IRA passing info to the RUC to help solve such a hideous murder that would give the latter real kudos with the general public? Never!

    I will follow this blog with interest and genuinely hope the pieces can fall into place to finally solve this before it is too late for her Mother. Do the police have a full DNA profile AND key suspects? Perhaps one or the other, but both? Although perhaps the profile they have does not match their main suspects (I simply refuse to believe they have not managed to get DNA samples from their suspects in all this time – by hook or by crook – it may be named PSNI now but RUC techniques and capabilities did not die with the name) in which case they are not going to disclose that because that may not rule the suspects out entirely, just as a DNA match would not necessarily be enough to get a conviction either. Perhaps they do indeed have a DNA match to a main suspect but need more to secure a conviction and are not going to risk prejudicing things by declaring their hand totally.

    Some interesting points being made above by you and others and I would like to reply to them soon when I have a chance.

    It is clear, and herein lies the potential power of this blog, that no matter what is speculated, no matter what is known and what is not, no matter what is in the public domain of knowledge and what is not, the best prospect for a successful conviction in this case is for a confession or testimony to take place. Therefore working on the hearts, minds and souls of people is absolutely the right approach. So, Keeley Moss, I salute you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi William,

      Thank you for what is one of the best and most perceptive comments I have yet received on any of the instalments of this blog or indeed across countless posts I’ve made in relation to the case on social media over the past few years.

      Although you say you’ve had scant awareness of the case since 1988 until only very recently, I think your comment above shows a quite rare insight into some of the myriad complexities of the case overall.

      I greatly appreciate your very kind and encouraging words where my own efforts are concerned. My work on this case has always been entirely unpaid and often puts me in quite dangerous situations for a lone woman as well as taking up literally every spare hour of my life, and I’m neither a conventional journalist nor a conventional investigator, so comments like yours help me to give me more confidence that what I’m doing is worthwhile.

      In particular the following comment of yours really hit home as I feel it intuitively grasps exactly what I’m trying to do, “It is clear…the best prospect for a successful conviction in this case is for a confession or testimony to take place. Therefore working on the hearts, minds and souls of people is absolutely the right approach.” Thank you.

      I think you’re spot-on with regards to what you say where the unlikeliness of a HGV having been utilised to drive into the forest is concerned. I know from having spoken with some RUC detectives (now retired) who worked on the original investigation in 1988 that no tyre tracks matching those of a HGV-type vehicle were found within the vicinity of the crime scene. And as I detailed in Part 9 of the blog, having walked all over the forest I believe it would have been inconceivable for such a vehicle to have been even attempted to be driven over what in many places involves very narrow and circuitous paths, and even more so under the cover of almost total darkness which to my mind would have made it simply impossible.

      With regards to what you ask about Inga-Maria’s camera, to quote the following passage from your comment: “I think the camera is a strong clue as to her death (or taken captive) being on the night of arrival, 6th April, assuming the culprit(s) did not remove film from the camera and that the film found therein fits with the timeline. This is possibly something the police might not have divulged as it would be something known only to the perpetrators.”

      I can confirm that the police did indeed divulge that Inga-Maria’s camera was found at the scene and all the rolls of film that she had used throughout her trip (which amounted to eight rolls in total) were present and intact. There was not one photo of her time in Northern Ireland, because they (and I) believe she never had the time to take any before she was murdered.

      I share your views where the local IRA investigation into Inga-Maria’s murder is concerned. I think the PSNI have their own reasons for having decided to release that information into the public domain, reasons that I have no doubt are strategic and presumably serve a definite purpose where a specific strand of the investigation is involved.

      While there is a lot about the case that I know, including a lot of information that has not been made publicly-available, there are certain things about the case that I do not know. So while there are certain pieces of information that I’m not at liberty to disclose, I would never claim to possess as many pieces of the investigative puzzle as the PSNI have assembled. However I will say that I do not believe there are any Unionist or Loyalist connections to the case, as mooted as a possibility in your comment.

      To answer the question you posed above, I can confirm that there is a full DNA profile from a crime scene donor in this case, and police recently announced they have a “suspect in mind”. They have recently spoken to the media about “possibly one or two” suspected accomplices. They (and I believe I) know exactly the number of people who were involved in this crime but due to possible legal implications it is necessary for them (and I) to speak in more vague terms rather than in specifics. In contrast with the criticism they are regularly subjected to from certain sections of the general public, I firmly believe the PSNI are on the right track in this case and that they are in possession of a lot more information than they are able to make public at the present time.

      I would like to thank you for your contribution to this forum, and for your interest in the campaign for truth and justice on behalf of Inga-Maria, and again for your kind and supportive words, and I look forward to reading more of your comments in the future.

      Kind regards,

      Keeley Moss

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